Brigittini Servitores Sanctissimi Salvatoris Institute -
Laudemus Domino   - AMDG!
Brigttini Servitores Sanctissimi Salvatoris Institute
Residentia Beatus Vilmos Apor
P. O. Box 4025 Tyler TX 75712
 
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EDITORIAL REFLECTIONS AND NOTES
These editorials listed in the reverse order, i.e . the newest one first, oldest one last.
For the Index of Editrial reflections (not includign the notes), please see the right hand column of this page!
 
Editorial note 05-18-2013
Please see the Prayers page for a hymn for Pentecost!
 
                Editorial note 05-05-2013
Let us get ready for Pentecost in the traditional way!
 
A traditional preparation for Pentecost consists of
  1. Observing Rogation days on the three days before Ascension Thursday by saying the Rogation Day litanies on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, which are an expanded version of the Litany of all Saints
A traditional preparation for Pentecost consists of
  1. Observing Rogation days on the three days before Ascension Thursday by saying the Rogation Day litanies on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, which are an expanded version of the Litany of all Saints
 
 
01-19-2013 -Editorial note
Our diocese, the Diocese of Tyler  believes that prayers and penance are powerful weapons. We are inviting you to join us  in the fight for life! 
8-29-2012 Eitorial note
Here are two links, worth looking at, albeit possibly in the wrong order, for the first title can be used to e celebrate the event described in the 2 link.
08-29-2012 Eitorial note
1. Latin hymns.
 The title is -5 Latin hymns which everyone should know.
The Hungarian text can safely be ignored. You still end up with 5 Latin texts and videos of the music of them. If you share it, please acknowledge the source- Magyar Kurír (Hungarian Catholic WEB site)
12.Gaudeamus! (8-29-2012) .
2. News about the canonical recognition granted to the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer at Papa Stronsay Island.
-
Below is an excerpt  from the WEB page, with  brief history and nature of this island.
History of the island of Papa Stronsay
Over 1400 years ago St. Columba (521-597) met with Brude, the King of the Picts, and also the chief ruler of the Orkney islands. In that meeting, recorded for us by Saint Adomnán of Iona (627 – 704), (Vita Columbae Bk 2 Ch. 43) St. Columba said to King Brude: "Some of our brethren have lately set sail, and are anxious to discover a desert in the pathless sea; should they happen, after many wanderings, to come to the Orkney islands, do thou carefully instruct this chief, whose hostages are in thy hand, that no evil befall them within his dominions." The Saint took care to give this direction, because he knew that after a few months St. Cormac would arrive in Orkney. So it afterwards came to pass, and to this advice of the holy man, Cormac owed his escape from impending death. These early monks — Papari — gave their name (From Latin, Papa via Old Irish, Papar - Fathers) to the islands where they set up their monastic settlements, their "deserts in the pathless sea". Their islands were called Papey, there were three such Papey islands in Orkney although through the centuries we now know of only two: one called Papey meiri ( or big Papey, -big Priests' Island- today known as Papa Westray) and one called Papey minni (or little Papey, — little Priests' Island — known now as Papa Stronsay). For more than 1400 years this island of Papa Stronsay has been set apart from the other Orkney islands as a holy island. It is recorded in the Orkneyinga saga (Ch. 18) that there were still monks living here 955 years ago when, in 1045, the Viking Earl Rognvald came to Papey minni to collect malt for his Christmas ale. The monks apparently produced malt from barley and to this day the island's small peninsular is called Corn Graand. The Earl in his viking barge, replete with shields covering its bulwarks, and a host of oarsmen did not return home alive. They were warmng themselves in the monastery when the house was surrounded by Rognvald's rival, Earl Thorfinn whose men quickly set fire to the building. They let the religious escape but slaughtered Earl Rognvald and his men.
The island of Papa Stronsay
Area: 74 ha (183 acres),Height: 43 ft (13 meters) above sea level.Location Latitude: 59.15°N Longitude: 2.58°W National Grid Reference: HY 666 293The island of Papa Stronsay is owned by the Monastery, which assures us the privacy and solitude that we need to live our life. Papa Stronsay is about 6 minutes by boat to the neighbouring Island of Stronsay. The Name "Papa Stronsay" means "Priests Island of Stronsay". The name from the Papar monks, who inhabited the island, withstood even the Viking invaders who settled Orkney from the 8th century onwards, because of the community of priests – monks, most likely – on Papa Stronsay.There are no gas, electricity, phone or water lines coming to Papa Stronsay. Electricity is generated by a diesel generator; water is pumped from 
Yes, indeed, this is worth celebrating with song or even dance, for lost ground on the northern tip of the British Isles is reclaimed for the faith, AMDG! Looking at the news, this goo news is just prat of the same process of Catholic tradition (Traditional religious life included) advancing. Let us therefor go forth with a thankful heart and renewed hope!
In Christo
Sister Margarita OSsS
 
11. Guest editorial  by  Gloria Thiele :The Brigittine clothing ceremony of  June  10  2012 (8-6-2012)
God cannot be undone by generosity, for more often than not, god give us what we needed, even without asking for it. Just as ií was contemplating how to describe  the ceremony. This si was the case with this guest editorial which Gloria published a description  (much better by an observant than a participant) Gloria submitted an account to an internet link(gloriainexcelsis says: In commenting to Father Z), sent me a copy and generously permitted for me to use it on the WEB page . How very like Gloria, to step in where needed! All I had to do is to copy it  Many thanks, Gloria!
 
Guest editorial  by  Gloria Thiele :The Brigittine clothing ceremony of June  10-2012.
It was a particularly beautiful External Solemnity of Corpus Christi. We were graced at our small Latin Mass parish (about 35 families and growing), St. Joseph the Worker, in Tyler, Texas, by a visit from our Apostolic Administrator of the Diocese, now bishop of Mayguez, Puerto Rico. His Excellency, the Most Reverend Alvaro Corrada del Rio, S.J., was in attendance to confer the Brigittine habit on Sister Margarita Igriczi-Nagy, O.Ss.S (previously of Servitores Reginae Apostolorum Institute which now became Brigittini Servitores Sanctissimi Salvatoris Institute). We had a sung Mass, Rev. Scott Allen, FSSP, the Pastor, celebrating. After the Credo was chanted, the Bishop was seated in the middle of the sanctuary at the altar rail, Father Allen seated to his right. Sister, standing at the back of the church began chanting the first part of Psalm 44, in Latin) answered by the choir. As she proceeded to the sanctuary entrance to kneel before the Bishop, Father chanted the second half with the choir responding. The Psalm is one of Sister’s favourites and requested by her.  The first line of the Psalm is ( English translation) “My heart hath uttered a good word; I speak my works to the King.”  The second half begins, “Hearken, O daughter, and see, and incline thy ear; and forget thy people and thy father’s house.” I’m in our little choir. I got all choked up and could hardly sing. The ceremony was so beautiful. Sister, kneeling on the hard floor – and she is 75 years old – begins, “Iube, Domne, benedicere!” (Pray, Lord Bishop, a blessing!)  The Bishop blessed her and inquired, “Quid vis, filia” (What do you ask, daughter?) And so from there she said that she wanted to follow the Brigittine path, and to direct the Servitores on the same path. The name of the Servitores is now changed to Brigittini Servitores Sanctissimi Salvatoris, and she wears the Brigittine form of the habit, with crown.  Each part of the habit was blessed, one by one – sandals, tunic, belt, scapular, wimple, veil and crown. The crown is a white circlet of fabric, with a cross of white over the top of the head. It has red jewel like accents at each juncture. A picture of St. Bridget (Birgitta) of Sweden, shows her wearing such a crown. As Sister went into the sacristy to change into her new habit, two of the choir members sang Schubert’s “Ave Maria,” in Latin, with all the proper words. It was permitted, since the vesting was not actually part of the Mass. Sister requested this particular “Ave Maria,” because it was played even during the Communist occupation of Hungary, Sister Margarita’s country of origin. It means a lot to her. There is so much more about the Brigittines, the charism, etc. Sister is dedicated to the Mass, the Divine Office, promoting the Office to the public, and Latin literacy. She is a wonder. Mass proceeded, followed by the Corpus Christi procession and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. It was a memorable day for all present. Luncheon followed to honour Bishop Corrada and further celebrate the day.  Bishop Corrada gave the homily, by the way. It was wonderful, strictly on the Eucharist, the gift of Himself that Christ left with us to be with us until the end of the world. He concentrated quite a bit on St. Paul’s Epistle of the day.God cannot be undone by generosity, for more often than not, god give us what we needed, even without asking for it. Just as ií was contemplating how to describe  the ceremony. This si was the case with this guest editorial which Gloria published a description  (much better by an observant than a participant) Gloria submitted an account to an internet link(gloriainexcelsis says: In commenting to Father Z), sent me a copy and generously permitted for me to use it on the WEB page . How very like Gloria, to step in where needed! All I had to do is to copy it and some pictures. Many thanks, Gloria!
10. Alea iacta est (July 12th 2012)
 Alea iacta est (The dice has been cast), said Iulius Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon. As you see form the changed name on the letterhead of the WEB page, the Servitores also crossed a Rubicon of sorts. 
On June 10th, our Bishop, The Most Reverend Alvaro Corrada del Rio SJ, has put the Brigittine veil and crown on me. In line with custom, man new foundations such as the Servitores sooner or later define their own spirituality and ally themselves with one of the existing religious families.  The other Brigittines are very welcoming towards the Servitores. We shall be the only branch, using the Latin Tridentine Mass and saying the Liturgical prayers in Latin. I am simply following a call on this.
More details will follow later. In the meantime, the history of our Brigittine aspirations is detailed in the editorial “On the Brigittine path”  of 1-6-2012. Please pray that the Brigittini Servitores shall grow and flourish for the greater glory of God!
In Christo
Sister Margarita OSsS
PS
Compare these two flags! One is one side of the flag of Hungarian army until 1945, the other is the Brigittine banner. Yes, I am a 1956 Hungarian, If God wants my prayers for Hungary on the Brigittine path on American soil, so be it!
9. A call to action (3-18-2012)
Every country in the world, including the United States of America, is beset by problems. We spend much time in thinking, speaking and writing about them, devising solutions. By all means, let us continue. Let us also make use of a powerful weapon in our problem solving, namely never omitting to pray for our country each day. Below is an example of efforts in this line. Let us not just ask in these prayers, but also give thanks to God for the good things what he has given to this land in His infinite mercy!
A CALL TO PRAYER
Translated from Hungarian to English.
On Feb. 22nd the Mária Rádió (Radio Maria) will launch a national prayer broadcast in all evenings at 8 p.m. from the Marian pilgrimage shrines in Hungary and in the annexed territories. With these prayers, people who feel a responsibility for the welfare of their nation, are turning to God together. Every family can join the prayer via the radio, with those praying also putting lighted candles in their windows, indicating that they joined the nationwide prayer.
The Radio Maria presents this prayer time every day, broadcasting from different locations, including Bodolló, Celldömölk, Doroszló, Máriapócs, Mátraverebély-Szentkút and Csíksomlyó. The Holy Bible says that if a person or a community is in big trouble, they need to cry out to the Lord with their full strength The people cried out to God when distressed by the enemy, when the community was languishing in captivity in Babylon, and the blind Bartimaeus cried out to Christ (cf. 3.9 Judges, 1 Kings 8.48 to 51; Mk 10.47). God heard these cries coming from the deep.
Our nation and the entire Western culture in many ways are going through an internal crisis. Many people are overtaken by despair and hopelessness. Many people do not have any ideals for which they could honestly be enthusiastic. Many people are haunted by internal emptiness, a feeling of being in the desert (cf. XVI. Pope Benedict: Ubicumque semper).
During the toughest years of Communist dictatorship the Paulist monks of Czestochowa launched an evening prayer, which was called " Apel' The prayer was said, quite specifically for Cardinal Wyszyński but also for the whole nation. The prayer session consisted of a hymn expressing faith and togetherness, of reading form the Holy Scriptures with a commentary on the reading, one decade of the rosary and a final blessing. The prayer was becoming widespread. After the regime change the televised broadcast of the Apel began. Many families at home in the evening are joining the Apel prayer of Czestochowa via TV, with the whole family calling out to God.
The Hungarian people too have an elementary need to cry out to God, so Radio Maria will launch these prayer broadcasts at eight p.m. every night from Hungarian pilgrimage shrines of Our Lady on Feb. 22 Ash Wednesday. As a sign of taking part in this prayer in common, we ask the participants to put a candle in the window, thus confirming that Christ, the Light of the World, is present in their home.
8. On the Brigittine Path (1-6-2012)
The Servitores is currently engaged in preserving and transmitting to future generations the Latin traditional Brigittine liturgy.
We began exploring the Brigittine path in 2002 and since then we have been touch with the Lady Abbess of Syon and received valuable help and guidance, including the very precious gift of the traditional Latin Brigittine Breviary. After the promulgation of Pope Benedict XVI’s 2007 Apostolic Letter given Motu Proprio “Summorum Pontificum” it was considered feasible both by Lady Abbess and myself to work towards associating the Servitores with the Brigittine family, which has communities established in several countries and using for liturgical prayers the language appropriate for their country,. Since then, adherence to Latin traditional liturgy became respectable and legitimate.
Embracing the spirituality of old standing religious orders which updated themselves after Vatican II without the updating is not an unknown phenomenon. There are Benedictine, Carmelite, Franciscan and Redemptorists communities who are using the Latin traditional liturgy and continuing the traditional way of religious life.
In 2011 the Syon Abbey of the Brigittines in England closed its doors, essentially because of lack of new vocations. This abbey, established in 1415, survived the penal times of England during which it was in exile, two world wars and the post war social upheavals, but in a fashion similar to many other religious communities, has not done well in terms of attracting vocations in the wake of the changes imposed on their liturgy and way of life. However, the contact between the retired Lady Abbess and Servitores is continuing.
The essence of Brigittine spirituality is a focus on the Eucharist, the Passion of Our Lord in a Marian setting by means of liturgical prayers, drawing on the revelations of Saint Birgitta. In its original form, there was strong reliance on priestly support from priests also embracing the Brigittine spirituality. In the wake of the Reformation, the male branches dwindled away, whilst women’s communities weathered the storms a bit better. However, they did not continue using the Brigittine Office. Some of them switched to the use of the Roman Divine Office after the Council of Trent and all of them switched to the vernacular and modified the Office in the 70-es when the Liturgy of the Hours was promulgated. The Brigittines of Syon Abbey started using the Roman Divine Office during their exile from England. The community returned to England in 1861. In 1906 with the approval of the Bishop of Plymouth, Syon Abbey returned to the use of the Brigittine Office and continued using it until the post-Vatican II liturgical reforms.
Given the central place of liturgical prayer in the Brigittine way of life, the starting point for embracing the Brigittine spirituality is praying in the Brigittine way, alongside with studying the Brigittine traditions in depth. The work has been going on in earnest for some time now. .
In 2010 the Servitores started adding the Brigittine propers to the Hours of the 1962 Latin traditional breviary, used by priestly societies and communities adhering to the traditional Latin liturgy of the Church. This is a stepwise process, in order to prevent any dislocation due to sudden changes in liturgical prayers. The aim is to add the Brigittine propers to all Hours except ad Matutinum, where only the readings, consisting of the visions of Saint Brigitte are taken. At present, the Brigittine propers are added to 3 of the Horus on most days. On Our Lady’s Feastdays the propers are added to all Hours, except ad Matutinum.
At first sight, one may even wonder if this addition is advisable, given the already long periods spent in liturgical prayers with the full reception of the Divine Office. However, even with these additions, we spend less time in liturgical prayer than in the original form of Brigittine life established by Saint Birgitta. Originally, where there were male Brigittines as well, the Sisters were present during the recitation of the regular Divine Office by the Brigittine Fathers and Brothers. Immediately afterwards, the Sisters proceeded with the recitation of the Brigittine Office.
The Brigittine Office is essentially a version of the Little Office of Our Lady, expanded to the length of the regular Divine Office, with the unique Brigittine feature of the readings ad Matutinum. Adding the Brigittine propers to the regular Divine Office, it fleshes it out, putting it under Our Lady’s mantle so to speak, with its Marian orientation.
The Roman Divine Office was originally part of Brigittine form of liturgical prayer. Its retention also makes sense from the practical point of view. . A central activity of the Servitores is to help others to learn how to say the Divine Office. Since priestly societies adhering to the traditional Latin liturgy of the Church are using the Roman Divine Office, this is the form in which the faithful need to be familiar, in order to be able to take part in the Divine Office in their parishes and missions.
There it is, in a nutshell. If it is God’s will for us to succeed, it will help to preserve a precious treasure of Catholic religious life. Hereby I am also extending an invitation to those who feel called to religious life to explore this path, best suited for pioneering spirits ready to roll up their sleeves for AMDG
Please remember us in your prayers, beseeching almighty God that we may be given the graces to persevere, the financial means to continue and vocations to ensure the future of the Servitores. Thank you and God bless you all!
In Christo
7. Standing firm (10-22-2011)
On August 31 2011, His Excellency, the Most Reverend Álvaro Corrada - del Rio SJ, Bishop of the Diocese of Tyler TX issued the decree of erection of the Servitores Reginae Apostolorum Institute as a public association of the Catholic faithful. This was done after a careful scrutiny of our Constitution and Rules which lays down the guiding principles for religious life with the traditional Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church at its center and its promotion as its primary external mission. Such wonderful things have happened to several other groups following the Latin traditional liturgy after the 2007 Motu Proprio of the Holy Father.
There have been very few times when the Catholic Church has not been beset by problems, often escalating to crisis level. Eventual, the crisis was resolved, often with the aid of groups which simply continued to profess and practice the faith, even in the face of opposition which came from powerful prelates within the Church. The attempts to suppress the Tridentine Mass after the introduction of the Novus Ordo Mass had created such a crisis-like situation.
In 2007 Pope Benedict XVI in his Apostolic Letter given Motu Proprio “Summorum Pontificum” clearly stated that the Tridentine Mass had never been suppressed and remains a valued form of the Holy Mass. This made attachment to the traditional Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church acceptable and a respectable Catholic stance... In the wake of this the Motu Proprio the several groups of religious attempted to come out from the cold, so to speak, by seeking full approbation, without being forced into unacceptable compromises in the name of fidelity to the Pope..
These efforts did not always succeed. Some groups simply were refused approval and so they remained in an irregular canonical status. Others were approved initially, but then slowly pushed into the compromise of abandoning exclusive adherence to the Tridentine Mass. In general, the stance of the bishop, based on understanding of the issues, was the key to success.
God in His infinite mercy has blessed the Servitores with a bishop who had a deep appreciation about the value of the traditional Latin liturgy for his diocese. His Excellency also had a strong determination to promote religious life within the diocese, supporting already established or emerging groups with viable apostolates, Servitores included. From time to time, The religious of the diocese are also getting together, to be aware of the different missions of other groups and to learn from the approaches of others. Many of us have a chance of meeting our bishop face to face on a regular basis, both to keep him up to date on our affairs, to receive valuable guidance and if needed, practical help.
So what else can I say beside Te Deum and Magnificat?
If you check the Prayers page, a new prayer, A prayer for our bishop, has been added.
In Christo
6. Celebrating an Anniversary ( 1-14-2011)
The First Sunday of Advent is a major milestone in my life. It marks the 25th anniversary of my full recitation of the Traditional Latin 1962 Divine Office. I want to celebrate this by talking about the Divine Office, presenting some of its features whilst also sharing how its love shaped my personal Odyssey
On the Divine Office
The Divine Office is one part of the Holy Liturgy, the public prayer offered up by the Church on behalf of and for the needs of all the faithful
Its basic skeleton is the psalms. The use of psalms in liturgical prayer goes back for more than 3000 years. We know that King David (cca 1000 BC) composed a few psalms; the Holy Bible tells us that he sung some at the time of the transfer of the Ark.
The Divine Office not only comprises psalms, but many other elements such as hymns, verses, prayers and even lessons and short chapters for our edification. If one looks at the Hour of the Divine Office as a piece of a beautiful jewelry, say a necklace or a ring, the psalms are the gold framework, the other elements the precious jewels. It is a song, embodying many varieties of poetry. It is a loving protestation our love of God, recounting His goodness. It is a prayer in the time of need for ourselves and others. It is an epic poetry, recounting not only what God has done for us, but also the virtues and deeds of Our Lady and the Saints; and as most epics, it urges us to follow examples of noble deeds and noble sentiments. It is also a soldiers’ marching song, impelling us to greater efforts assuring us of the possibility of victory on the spiritual battlefront.
In the early Church, the Christian faithful gathered in the evening before Sundays and spent the night reciting prayers and hymns until the Holy Mass early morning. The Hours of ad Vesperas, ad Matutinum and ad Laudes were born this way. Later on with the development of monasticism it was felt that there should be more prayers during the day, and so the Hours of ad Tertiam, ad Sextam and ad Nonam were added. The morning prayer of ad Primam before the start of daily work and the night-time prayer of ad Completorium were the last two additions.
Since it is the public prayer of the Church, all priests and many religious are bound to the recitation of the Divine Office under pain of sin. By saying the Divine Office not only ensures that they work for the salvation of others, but doing so also sanctifies them to a greater degree than any other type of prayer.
All priests are bound to the full recitation at the Divine Office. Secular clergy may recite the Hours on their own, in private, but joining with others in common recitation also fulfills their obligation. For religious congregations, the number of Hours and the manner (i.e. whether in private or in common, and if in common, which Hours are to be chanted and which recited) is determined by their Constitution. In general, contemplative orders say the whole Office, active orders say only some of the Hours. Naturally, religious are permitted to go beyond the minimum obligation. In addition to priest and religious, devout faithful are also free to make the Divine Office part of their prayer life. In some Traditional parishes, the faithful join in some of the Hours; others recite the Divine Office on their own. This is a time hallowed custom, witness the many beautifully illustrated breviaries, often preserved in museums, which were made for specific people..
The Servitores are bound to the full recitation of the Divine Office. We take four vows, adding the obligation of full recitation of the Divine Office as the fourth vow besides the standard vows of poverty, obedience and chastity. A Servitor regards the Holy Liturgy as the fulcrum of our life, fitting in other duties and activities between the Holy Mass and the Hours of the Divine Office. Indeed, one may even say that the Servitores came into being because of the love of the Divine Office, the official praise of the Church, the Bride of Christ, to our Creator.
How the Servitores Reginae Apostolorum Institute was born.
It began in the mid-70s, when I came upon a volume of the Hours of the Divine Office in Latin and English, published by Liturgical Press, Collegeville Minnesota in 1964. It opened a new window for me, so I quickly purchased the other two volumes. I read the introductory explanation about the nature of the Divine Office avidly; this was something new for me. I was also beginning to say some of the prayers from it, in a rather random fashion. My love for the Divine Office grew progressively and I was already praying a few of the Hours on a daily basis by the time of a pilgrimage to Lourdes. There, meeting with other people who were so attracted to the Divine Office that it was already a part of their regular prayer life, I experienced two things. First, I felt some disappointment when I realised that the Latin version of the Psalter in my book was not the one used by those reciting the traditional Divine Office, but a newer version of the psalms, approved by Pope Pius XII for private recitation. This was easy to remedy, I was able to obtain a volume of the Divine Office with the Vulgate version totally in Latin. I also discovered the joy resulting from recitation of the Hours in common. I came back from Lourdes, praying the Divine Office with such regularity that I could commit to its full recitation was not a rash assumption of an unmanageable burden.
God often pays back for our puny little efforts of reaching out towards Him with graces of desire to do more. By the time the Sacred Triduum of 1986 rolled around, I was able to follow the prayers with some understanding and even to take part in it with others. The beautiful lamentations of Jeremiah truly moved me. I offered up my profusely flowing tears to Our Lord, shed for His sufferings and for sufferings depicted so similar to the sufferings of people in Hungary, my native land where, compared to the largish flow of happier times, the songs of praise became just a trickle. Walking in the sunshine afterwards, I just knew with a certainty what I was called to do - to fill the gap with my voice.
At that time, Hungary, my native land, was still under Soviet occupation. In the 50-s almost all religious orders were outlawed, their members forbidden to associate with each other. A few Franciscans and Benedictines were allowed to continue as teaching orders, but contemplative orders were absolutely illegal. This law was in force until the 90-es. One could assume that once a vowed religious, their habit of prayers will survive, no matter what; however, it was not really possible to pray the Divine Office without any books or opportune occasions in camp or in prison, where many priests and religious were sent..
After that, I was led stepwise, not acting rashly, always acting in obedience to those who were directing my spiritual life. In the end, the Servitores Reginae Apostolorum Institute saw the day..
I started to beseech my confessor to permit me to be bound to the full recitation of the Divine Office under pain of sin. Father hesitated in the name of prudence, and then inexplicably, I obtained the sought after permission on August 14, which in Hungary is also the Feast of Saint Maximilian Kolbe.
Next came the desire to present the flowers of praise in a nicely prepared bouquet, i.e. the need for a rule of life. With this in place, the time for the next step was ready – to set up the framework for a religious association to which other likeminded faithful could join. Hence the Servitores Reginae Apostolorum Institute was born. Our love of God overflows into charity towards others, reaching out to them so that we can pray for them and with them, to strengthen their faith, and understanding of it and also help them to make the Divine Office part of their prayer life. Where and how this is done will be the subject of the next article.
7. Standing firm (10-22-2011)
On August 31 2011, His Excellency, the Most Reverend Álvaro Corrada - del Rio SJ, Bishop of the Diocese of Tyler TX issued the decree of erection of the Servitores Reginae Apostolorum Institute as a public association of the Catholic faithful. This was done after a careful scrutiny of our Constitution and Rules which lays down the guiding principles for religious life with the traditional Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church at its center and its promotion as its primary external mission. Such wonderful things have happened to several other groups following the Latin traditional liturgy after the 2007 Motu Proprio of the Holy Father.
There have been very few times when the Catholic Church has not been beset by problems, often escalating to crisis level. Eventual, the crisis was resolved, often with the aid of groups which simply continued to profess and practice the faith, even in the face of opposition which came from powerful prelates within the Church. The attempts to suppress the Tridentine Mass after the introduction of the Novus Ordo Mass had created such a crisis-like situation.
In 2007 Pope Benedict XVI in his Apostolic Letter given Motu Proprio “Summorum Pontificum” clearly stated that the Tridentine Mass had never been suppressed and remains a valued form of the Holy Mass. This made attachment to the traditional Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church acceptable and a respectable Catholic stance... In the wake of this the Motu Proprio the several groups of religious attempted to come out from the cold, so to speak, by seeking full approbation, without being forced into unacceptable compromises in the name of fidelity to the Pope..
These efforts did not always succeed. Some groups simply were refused approval and so they remained in an irregular canonical status. Others were approved initially, but then slowly pushed into the compromise of abandoning exclusive adherence to the Tridentine Mass. In general, the stance of the bishop, based on understanding of the issues, was the key to success.
God in His infinite mercy has blessed the Servitores with a bishop who had a deep appreciation about the value of the traditional Latin liturgy for his diocese. His Excellency also had a strong determination to promote religious life within the diocese, supporting already established or emerging groups with viable apostolates, Servitores included. From time to time, The religious of the diocese are also getting together, to be aware of the different missions of other groups and to learn from the approaches of others. Many of us have a chance of meeting our bishop face to face on a regular basis, both to keep him up to date on our affairs, to receive valuable guidance and if needed, practical help.
So what else can I say beside Te Deum and Magnificat?
If you check the Prayers page, a new prayer, A prayer for our bishop, has been added.
In Christo
5. The Servitores abroad - a visit to England. (10-1- 2010)
A case can be made out for a monthly editorial letter not only about the current preoccupations of the Servitores, but also about those things which are permanent in our lives.
As it is often the case, it is hard to start when one has so much to say. However, the recent visit of the Holy Father to Great Britain gave me a good starting point. With England so much in the news, It may be more interesting for our readers to hear more about my trip to England this summer. This trip had three highlights:
1. Traditional Solemn High Mass Saint James church of the Spanish Place in London
2. Daily visits to the Brompton Oratory for the Tridentine Mass and talking with Oratorian Fathers
3. Conference with the Lady Abbess at the Brigittine Abbey of Syon
1. Traditional Solemn High Mass Saint James Church of the Spanish Place in London
The first Solemn High Mass of Rev. Father S. Harkins FSSP in England was celebrated in Saint James Church of Spanish Place in London. This church, originally a Spanish embassy chapel, was a place of refuge to Catholics during the Penal Times. This was my first visit there. You can learn more about its history form this WEB site:
Rev. Father S. Harkins had already celebrated a Solemn High Mass in Scotland, where the Primate of Scotland was in attendance, Through his generosity and the energetic organising ability of the English Region of the FSSP, those living south of Hadrian’s wall were also privileged to be present a this momentous occasion and also to receive Father’s first priestly blessing.
2. Daily visits to the Brompton Oratory for the Tridentine Mass and talking with Oratorian Fathers
The Brompton Oratory is the church of the London Oratorian Fathers. Blessed Cardinal Newman was also an Oratorian, but he established his base in Birmingham. The London Oratorian
community was established by Rev. Father W. Faber, one of the sanest Catholic priestly writers and also the composer of many beautiful hymns. The Fathers of the Brompton Oratory survived when so many religious commutes dwindled away and are doing magnificent work. The following article describes things as they stand for the Brompton Oratory (except that there is now a Tridentine Mass offered daily),and is worthwhile to read:
3. Conference with the Lady Abbess at the Brigittine Abbey of Syon
Compared to these two magnificent churches, the chapel of Syon Abbey of the Brigittine Order is very simple and yet infinitely precious because it too, breathes English Catholic history; for within it is a stone from the gatehouse of the original Syon Abbey, destroyed during the Reformation. When forced to flee, the Sisters carried this stone with themselves to exile and from country to country during their enforced wanderings. When they went back to England the stone came with them.
There is a good WEB article with many pictures at : http://www.kellerbook.com/today.html
Both at Saint James Church at the Brompton Oratory, I had the privilege of talking with FSSP Fathers and the Oratorian Fathers. In essence, these were courtesy visits; however, with the Lady Abbess of Syon Abbey it had a definite purpose, namely, furthering the existing ties between Syon Abbey and the Servitores.
It has been realised as early as 2003 that there are many elements in the Servitores which are close to the Brigittine spirituality. I was accepted as a Sister of the Chapter of Syon Abbey in 2004 and since then we have been united in prayer. In general, in the wake of Vatican II Council the existing Brigittine communities updated their constitutions and Offices and are using the vernacular. The 2007 Motu Proprio of the Holy Father legitimised the use of Latin traditional liturgy by any community wishing to do so, so closer association between traditional and updated communities is not unusual, any more.
With the generous s help and guidance of the Lady Abbess and the assistance of Fathers guiding the Servitores, we are learning more and more about the Brigittine way of life. The process of adding step by step the Propers (i.e. parts other than the psalms) of the Brigittine Office to the end of the Hours of the regular 1952 Latin Divine Office has begun. Given the Marian orientation of the Brigittine Divine Office, it is fitting that the first Hours adapted were those of the Offices on the Feast-days of Our Lady.
In my next letter, I shall write about something very permanent in our lives, namely the central significance of the Traditional Latin Divine Office in the lives of the Servitores. The Divine Office is one of the two significant components of the Traditional Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church: The other component is the Traditional Latin Mass..
4. Preparing for Pentencost (5-8-2010)
It is a nice traditional custom to follow in the wake of the Blessed Mother and the Holy Apostles and spend the time between Ascension Thursday and Pentecost in prayer. I am therefore placing the Novena to the Holy Ghost on the "Prayers (Section of Devotions)" page.
The novena to the Holy Ghost is a novena for the 9 days, from Friday after Ascension Thursday, to the Vigil of Pentecost, inclusive. The meditations and prayers differ for each day, focusing on a particular gift of the Holy Ghost. However, the intentions should be the same for each day of this novena. In the copy provided, the prayer intentions and the intended recipients are in red letters. Feel free to substitute your recipient (which of course, can be you) and intentions!
Another prayerful custom to keep is to recite the Litany of all Saints on ever one of the Rogation Days (Monday-Wednesday inclusive, before Ascension Thursday.) by. In their fullest form, these litanies are sung during a procession. Naturally you can also say them in private.
3. Let us join them in prayer! (4-26-2010)
Prayer campaign - Mondjatok áldást! (Say a blessing!) –from May 1 to June 9, inclusive
Source of information: Magyar Kurír http://www.magyarkurir.hu
In these days, when they are attacking and humiliating Pope Benedict XVI with untrue accusations from many sides, two Hungarian national Marian shrines are asking the Catholic faithful to join them with prayers and/or for sacrifices for 40 days.
The Rector of Máriapócs, Rev. Father István Kapics and the Rector of Mátraverebély–Szentkút, Rev. Father Peregrin Kálmán OFM are asking all men of goodwill and religious communities to join them by performing some form of sacrifice daily for 40 days. These sacrifices can be prayers, fasting or corporal works of mercy. The starting date is May 1.
This is how these 2 Fathers put it:
Let us jointly offer up these sacrifices for the Holy Father and for those attacking him, as Saint Peter urged us: ‘”Not rendering evil for evil, nor railing for railing, but contrariwise, blessing: for unto this are you called, that you may inherit a blessing.” Saint Peter I, 3:9.!
The prayer campaign and the name of participants will be forwarded to Rome by the Rectors of the two shrines. Let us show the flag from this side of the Atlantic as well!
The Servitores will say Psalm 6, one of the penitential psalms, daily during these 40 days.
How to join?
You can send your name and the nature of the sacrifice through the Servitores via e-mail write to the shrines directly:
Nemzeti Kegyhely
4326 Máriapócs, Kossuth tér 25.
Nemzeti Kegyhely
3077 Mátraverebély–Szentkút 14.
2.Thoughts on New Year's Eve (12-31-2009)
One nice Catholic custom is to say a Te Deum for God’s gifts in 2009 just before retiring (or before midnight if we are still up) and a Veni Creator Spiritus on rising tomorrow, for the help of God in 2010.
Let us be profuse in our thanks, for the spiritual and temporal gifts and for the crosses, whether these are sufferings because of misfortunes affecting us, or the pain of witnessing the misfortunes of those who are near and dear to us.
Let us be bold in our request, without however, forgetting that the most precious gifts - both for ourselves and others - , are spiritual, leading to our sanctification, However, whilst on this earthly pilgrimage, we have temporal needs as well and in the spirit of openness, let us not be diffident in laying our hopes, needs and wants at the foot of God’s heavenly throne.
To make things easier, I am putting the copies of these prayers ( taken from the Breviary section of http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/.). on the "Prayers" page
Wishing you a blessed New Year and asking for your prayers -
In Christo: Sister Margarita
1.Thoughts on the Feast of Saint Stephan Protomartyr.
(12-26-2009)
After months of prayerful deliberations, the WEB –site of the Servitores is born as the first fruit of very grace-filled Christmas.
This is also a fitting day for something noteworthy; for this is the anniversary of Cardinal Mindszenty’s arrest by the Communists in 1948. Sometimes dates are significant; for not only is this the Feast of Saint Stephen, the Protomartyr of the Church, but is also the namesake of Saint Stephen, King of Hungary.
Cardinal Mindszenty did not bend in the face of opposition and weakened as he was by his past sufferings, neither did he stop working for the welfare of souls and the glory of the Church.
Wishing to follow in his footsteps of ceaseless labour, I am humbly presenting to all readers my puny little offerings. Please help us with your prayers that we persevere and with your suggestions that this WEB-site would be an aid to all, but especially to those who deeply love the Tridentine Mass and the rational Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church.
8-29-2012)
INDEX OF EDITORIAL REFLECTIONS
1.Thoughts on the Feast of Saint Stephan  Protomartyr. (12-26-2009)
2.Thoughts on New Year's Eve. (12-31-2009)
3. Let us join them in prayer! (4-26-2010)
4. Preparing for Pentencost (5-8-2010)
5. The Servitores abroad - a visit to England.   (10-1-2010)
6. Celebrating an Anniversary ( 1-14-2011)
7. Standing firm (10-22-2011)
8. On the Brigittine Path (1-6-2012)
9. A call to action (3-18-2012)
10.Alea iacta est (7-12-2012)
11. Guest editorial  by  Gloria Thiele :The   Brigittine clothing ceremony of  June  10  2012 (8-6-2012)
12. Gaudeamus! (8-29-2012)
.
LINKS WORTH LOOKING AT:
Opinions or positions found on the following websites do not necessarily reflect the position of the Servitores
1.The Latin Mass Socety in England
This WEB site has the  best and  quite a complete archive of articles on the traditional movement 
2. . Rorate Caeli
Fresh items appear almost daily, giving a place of importance to our Holy Father Benedict XVI and to his sayings. There is also  generous space for events among the followers of the Traditional Latin liturgy of the Catholic Church.
3.The complete Breviarium Romanum in Latin, English and Hungarian
of several versions (i.e. 1 960 and previous versions
(from the side panel of Rorate Caeli)
4. Sancta Missa
This WEB-site of the 
 has liturgical texts, commentaries on the liturgy and instructive videos on celebrating and serving the Tridentine Mass.
5. Angelus Press
It is the publishing organ of the SSPX. It carries a large selection of Catholic books. It is also a useful source of liturgical texts and calendars, following the 1962 Missal and Divine Office.
6. Priestly societies whose members are celebrating the Tridentine Mass  (a. .k.a. as the extraordinary form of the Roman rite) 
Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter
Canonical status: regular
Institute of Christ the KIng
Canonical status: regular
Society of Saint Pius X.
Their canonical status is still irregular, but their Holy Masses are valid. For further information see the letter of the Ecclesia Dei Commission on January 18, 2003 in Archives of http://www.latin-mass-society.org/
 
 
 
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